Arnold Brooks

Arnold Brooks
Assistant Instructional Professor
Stuart Hall, Room 226
Office Hours: Winter Quarter: Tuesdays, 10:00 am - 12:00 pm
PhD, University of Chicago, 2021; MA, University of Chicago, 2009; BA, Philosophy, Penn State University, 2006
Teaching at UChicago since 2021
Research Interests: Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy, Kant, Metaphysics, History and Philosophy of Science

Arnold Brooks joined the faculty in Autumn 2021 as an Assistant Instructional Professor. He received his BA in philosophy from Pennsylvania State University and his PhD in Philosophy from the University of Chicago in 2021. He specializes in ancient Greek physics and metaphysics. His current research centers on a book-length study of Aristotle’s Physics book six, his theory of the continuum, and his account of natural continua such as time, change, and body. Brooks is also pursuing a parallel project in Kant’s early and critical philosophy, through Kant’s approach to the quantification of qualities and causes, and forces. He is the departmental faculty liaison to the Masters of Arts Program in the Humanities (MAPH) in 2021-22.

Recent Courses

PHIL 29617/39617 Force

The concept of a force is fundamental to post-Newtonian physics. But what is a force, and how did we come to think of natural phenomena in terms of forces? This course will investigate the philosophical development of the concept of force from its origins in early modern philosophy (Suarez, Leibniz) to its maturity in the philosophy and science of the 18th and 19th centuries (Kant, Newton, Hegel). In particular we will investigate Leibniz’s suggestion that “physical forces are nothing but the entelechies of the ancients,”—the idea that forces play the conceptual role of Aristotelian forms, in ancient and medieval physics. Central to our project will be the question of how the qualitative features of reality can be quantified.

2021-2022 Spring
Category
Early Modern Philosophy (including Kant)
Metaphysics

PHIL 29902 Senior Seminar II

Students writing senior essays register once for PHIL 29901, in the Autumn Quarter, and once for PHIL 29902, in the Winter Quarter. The Senior Seminar meets for two quarters, and students writing essays are required to attend throughout.

Consent of Director of Undergraduate Studies. Required and only open to fourth-year students who have been accepted into the BA essay program.

PHIL 21730/31730 Aristotle's Metaphysics

Aristotle’s Metaphysics is one of the most difficult and rewarding texts in the philosophical tradition. It attempts to lay out the goals, methods, and primary results of a science Aristotle calls “first philosophy.” First philosophy is the study of beings just insofar as they are beings (as opposed to physics, which studies beings insofar as they come to be, pass away, or change), and if completed it would stand as the most fundamental and general science. Our aim will be to understand: if and how such a science is possible, what the principles of such a science are, what being is, which beings are primary, and what are the causes of being qua being. We will discuss the Metaphysics as a whole, but focus on A, Γ, Η, Ζ, Θ, and Λ. Our approach will be “forest,” rather than “tree” oriented, preferring in most cases a coherent overview to close reading.

 

2021-2022 Winter
Category
Ancient Philosophy
Metaphysics

PHIL 25000 History of Philosophy I: Ancient Philosophy

(CLCV 22700)

An examination of ancient Greek philosophical texts that are foundational for Western philosophy, especially the work of Plato and Aristotle. Topics will include: the nature and possibility of knowledge and its role in human life; the nature of the soul; virtue; happiness and the human good.

Completion of the general education requirement in humanities.

2021-2022 Autumn
Category
Ancient Philosophy

PHIL 29901 Senior Seminar I

Students writing senior essays register once for PHIL 29901, in the Autumn Quarter, and once for PHIL 29902, in the Winter Quarter. The Senior Seminar meets for two quarters, and students writing essays are required to attend throughout.

Consent of Director of Undergraduate Studies. Required and only open to fourth-year students who have been accepted into the BA essay program.

PHIL 25000 History of Philosophy I: Ancient Philosophy

(CLCV 22700)

An examination of ancient Greek philosophical texts that are foundational for Western philosophy, especially the work of Plato and Aristotle. Topics will include: the nature and possibility of knowledge and its role in human life; the nature of the soul; virtue; happiness and the human good.

Completion of the general education requirement in humanities.

2019-2020 Autumn
Category
Ancient Philosophy