Bart Schultz

Bart Schultz
Senior Lecturer in Philosophy, Director of the Civic Knowledge Project
Gates-Blake 126
Office Hours: Autumn Quarter, Mondays and Wednesdays: 3:00 - 3:30 pm & Fridays: 12:00 - 1:30 pm
773.702.6007
Teaching at UChicago since 1987
Research Interests: Political Philosophy, Ethics

Bart Schultz is Senior Lecturer in Humanities (Philosophy) and Director of the Office of Civic Engagement's Civic Knowledge Project. He has been teaching in the College at the University of Chicago since 1987, designing a wide range of core courses as well as courses on Philosophy and Public Education, The Philosophy of Poverty, John Dewey, The Chicago School of Philosophy, Political Philosophy, Environmental Philosophy, and Happiness. He has also published widely in philosophy, and his books include Essays on Henry Sidgwick (Cambridge, 1992); Henry Sidgwick: Eye of the Universe (Cambridge [2004], winner of the American Philosophical Society's Jacques Barzun Prize in Cultural History); Utilitarianism and Empire (Lexington, 2005); and The Happiness Philosophers: Lives of the Eminent Utilitarians (Princeton, 2015). He is on the Editorial Board of Utilitas, the leading professional journal of utilitarian studies.  Through the Civic Knowledge Project (CKP), he has developed a number of public ethics programs affording rich opportunities for UChicago students, staff, and faculty to get involved in educationally relevant ways with the larger South Side community.  In 2017, he launched the CKP's MLK Initiative, an extensive and ongoing set of programs commemorating and advancing the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  The CKP is also particularly involved in designing diverse and inclusive philosophy programs for disadvantaged adults and for underserved public elementary and middle school students in the neighborhoods near the University of Chicago, and its Winning Words precollegiate philosophy program won the 2012 American Philosophical Association's PDC Prize for Excellence and Innovation in Philosophy Programs. Bart has also served on the Board of Directors of PLATO (Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization), the main professional group in the United States promoting precollegiate philosophy, and won the 2013 PUSHExcel Excellence in Teaching Award from the RainbowPUSH Coalition.  He is a member of Etica & Politica's international research group on democracy and ethics.

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Selected Publications

Editor, Sacred Ground: The Chicago Streets of Timuel Black. With Susan Klonsky.  (Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 2018)

Not Eye to Eye: A Comment on the Commentaries,” Etica & Politica, published online July 24, 2018.

Review of Katarzyna de Lazari-Radek and Peter Singer, Utilitarianism: A Very Short Introduction. Utilitas, published online 19 February 2018.

The Happiness Philosophers: The Lives and Works of the Great Utilitarians (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2017)

Editor, Book Symposium on Katarzyna de Lazari-Radek and Peter Singer, The Point of View of the Universe: Sidgwick and Contemporary Ethics. With original contributions by Roger Crisp, Brad Hooker, Derek Parfit, and Mariko Nakano, and replies by Katarzyna de Lazari-Radek and Peter Singer. Etica & Politica, Vol. XVIII, No. 1 (Trieste: University of Trieste, April 2016).

“The New Chicago School of Philosophy.” Rounded Globe, November 15, 2015.

Henry Sidgwick, Eye of the Universe: An Intellectual Biography (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004). Winner of the American Philosophical Society’s Jacques Barzun Prize in Cultural History for 2004.

Henry Sidgwick.” Entry in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (electronic text), edited by Edward Zalta (October 5, 2004). Substantively revised and updated, 2011 and 2015.

Editor/Contributor, with P. Bucolo and R. Crisp, Proceedings of the World Congress--University of Catania on H. Sidgwick: Happiness and Religion (Catania: Universita degli Studi di Catania, 2007)

Editor/Contributor, with G. Varouxakis, Utilitarianism and Empire (Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2005)

General Editor, The Complete Works and Select Correspondence of Henry Sidgwick (Charlottesville, VA: Past Masters Series, InteLex Corporation, 1997, 2nd ed. 1999)

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Recent Courses

PHIL 29411 Consequentialism from Bentham to Singer

(PLSC 29411)

Are some acts wrong "whatever the consequences"? Do consequences matter when acting for the sake of duty, or virtue, or what is right? How do "consequentialist" ethical theories, such as utilitarianism, address such issues? This course will address these questions by critically examining some of the most provocative defenses of consequentialism in the history of philosophy, from the work of the classical utilitarians Bentham, Mill, and Sidgwick to that of Peter Singer, one of the world's most influential living philosophers and the founder of the animal liberation and effective altruism movements. Does consequentialism lend itself to the Panoptical nightmares of the surveillance state, or can it be a force for a genuinely emancipatory ethics and politics? (A)

2018-2019 Spring
Category
Ethics

PHIL 21499 Philosophy and Philanthropy

(MAPH 31499, PLSC 21499, HMRT 21499)

Perhaps it is better to give than to receive, but exactly how much giving ought one to engage in and to whom or what?  Recent ethical and philosophical developments such as the effective altruism movement suggest that relatively affluent individuals are ethically bound to donate a very large percentage of their wealth to worthy causes—for example, saving as many lives as they possibly can, wherever in the world those lives may be.  And charitable giving or philanthropy is not only a matter of individual giving, but also of giving by foundations, corporations, non-profits, governmental and non-governmental agencies, and other organizational entities that play a very significant role in the modern world. How, for example, does an institution like the University of Chicago engage in and justify its philanthropic activities? Can one generalize about the various rationales for philanthropy, whether individual or institutional? Why do individuals or organizations engage in philanthropy, and do they do so well or badly, for good reasons, bad reasons, or no coherent reasons?

This course will afford a broad, critical philosophical and historical overview of philanthropy, examining its various contexts and justifications, and contrasting charitable giving with other ethical demands, particularly the demands of justice. How do charity and justice relate to each other?  The course will be developed in active conversation with the work of the UChicago Civic Knowledge Project and Office of Civic Engagement, and students will be presented with some practical opportunities to engage reflectively in deciding whether, why and how to donate a certain limited amount of (course provided) funding.

2018-2019 Winter
Category
Social/Political Philosophy

PHIL 22001 Teaching Precollegiate Philosophy

(MAPH 32001)

This course will consider the practices of philosophy through a critical examination of different approaches to teaching precollegiate philosophy. Philosophy at the precollegiate level is common outside of the U.S., and there is a growing movement in the U.S. to try to provide greater opportunities, in both public and private schools, for K12 students to experience the joys of philosophizing. But what are the different options for teaching precollegiate philosophy and which are best? That is the main question that this course will address. Students in this course will also have the opportunity to include an experiential learning component by participating in the UChicago Winning Words precollegiate philosophy program. (A)

2018-2019 Winter
Category
Social/Political Philosophy

PHIL 22209 Philosophies of Environmentalism & Sustainability

(ENST 22209, GNSE 22204, HMRT 22201, PLSC 22202)

Many of the toughest ethical and political challenges confronting the world today are related to environmental issues: for example, climate change, loss of biodiversity, the unsustainable use of natural resources, pollution, and other threats to the well-being of both present and future generations. Using both classic and contemporary works, this course will highlight some of the fundamental and unavoidable philosophical questions presented by such environmental issues. Can a plausible philosophical account of justice for future generations be developed? What counts as the ethical treatment of non-human animals? What do the terms "nature" and "wilderness" mean, and can natural environments as such have moral and/or legal standing? What fundamental ethical and political perspectives inform such positions as ecofeminism, the "Land Ethic," political ecology, ecojustice, and deep ecology? And does the environmental crisis confronting the world today demand new forms of ethical and political philosophizing and practice? Are we in the Anthropocene? Is "adaptation" the best strategy at this historical juncture? Field trips, guest speakers, and special projects will help us philosophize about the fate of the earth by connecting the local and the global. (A)

2018-2019 Autumn
Category
Ethics
Social/Political Philosophy

PHIL 22819 Philosophy of Education

(MAPH 32819, PLSC 22819, CHDV 22819)

What are the aims of education? Are they what they should be, for purposes of cultivating flourishing citizens of a liberal democracy? What are the biggest challenges - philosophical, political, cultural, and ethical - confronting educators today, in the U.S. and across the globe? How can philosophy help address these? In dealing with such questions, this course will provide an introductory overview of both the philosophy of education and various educational programs in philosophy, critically surveying a few of the leading ways in which philosophers past and present have framed the aims of education and the educational significance of philosophy. From Plato to the present, philosophers have contributed to articulating the aims of education and developing curricula to be used in various educational contexts, for diverse groups and educational levels. This course will draw on both classic and contemporary works, but considerable attention will be devoted to the work and legacy of philosopher/educator John Dewey, a founding figure at the University of Chicago and a crucial resource for educators concerned with cultivating critical thinking, creativity, character, and ethical reflection. The course will also feature field trips, distinguished guest speakers, and opportunities for experiential learning.

2017-2018 Spring
Category
Social/Political Philosophy

PHIL 22209 Philosophies of Environmentalism & Sustainability

(MAPH 32209, ENST 22209, GNSE 22204, HMRT 22201, PLSC 22202)

Many of the toughest ethical and political challenges confronting the world today are related to environmental issues: for example, climate change, loss of biodiversity, the unsustainable use of natural resources, pollution, and other threats to the well-being of both present and future generations. Using both classic and contemporary works, this course will highlight some of the fundamental and unavoidable philosophical questions presented by such environmental issues. Can a plausible philosophical account of justice for future generations be developed? What counts as the ethical treatment of non-human animals? What do the terms "nature" and "wilderness" mean, and can natural environments as such have moral and/or legal standing? What fundamental ethical and political perspectives inform such positions as ecofeminism, the "Land Ethic," political ecology, ecojustice, and deep ecology? And does the environmental crisis confronting the world today demand new forms of ethical and political philosophizing and practice? Are we in the Anthropocene? Is "adaptation" the best strategy at this historical juncture? Field trips, guest speakers, and special projects will help us philosophize about the fate of the earth by connecting the local and the global. (A) (B)

2017-2018 Autumn
Category
Social/Political Philosophy

PHIL 22209 Philosophies of Environmentalism & Sustainability

(MAPH 32209, ENST 22209, GNSE 22204, HMRT 22201, PLSC 22202)

Many of the toughest ethical and political challenges confronting the world today are related to environmental issues: for example, climate change, loss of biodiversity, the unsustainable use of natural resources, pollution, and other threats to the well-being of both present and future generations. Using both classic and contemporary works, this course will highlight some of the fundamental and unavoidable philosophical questions presented by such environmental issues. Can a plausible philosophical account of justice for future generations be developed? What counts as the ethical treatment of non-human animals? What do the terms "nature" and "wilderness" mean, and can natural environments as such have moral and/or legal standing? What fundamental ethical and political perspectives inform such positions as ecofeminism, the "Land Ethic," political ecology, ecojustice, and deep ecology? And does the environmental crisis confronting the world today demand new forms of ethical and political philosophizing and practice? Are we in the Anthropocene? Is "adaptation" the best strategy at this historical juncture? Field trips, guest speakers, and special projects will help us philosophize about the fate of the earth by connecting the local and the global. (A) (B)

2017-2018 Autumn
Category
Ethics
Social/Political Philosophy

PHIL 22001 Teaching Precollegiate Philosophy

(MAPH 32001)

This course will consider the practices of philosophy through a critical examination of different approaches to teaching precollegiate philosophy. Philosophy at the precollegiate level is common outside of the U.S., and there is a growing movement in the U.S. to try to provide greater opportunities, in both public and private schools, for K12 students to experience the joys of philosophizing. But what are the different options for teaching precollegiate philosophy and which are best? That is the main question that this course will address. Students in this course will also have the opportunity to include an experiential learning component by participating in the UChicago Winning Words precollegiate philosophy program. (A) (B)

2016-2017 Spring
Category
Social/Political Philosophy

PHIL 22209 Philosophies of Environmentalism & Sustainability

(ENST 22209, GNSE 22204, HMRT 22201, MAPH 32209, PLSC 22202)

Some of the greatest ethical and political challenges confronting the world today are related to environmental issues: for example, climate change, loss of biodiversity, the unsustainable use of natural resources, and other threats to the well-being of both present and future generations. Using both classic and contemporary works, this course will highlight some of the fundamental and unavoidable philosophical questions informing such environmental issues. Can a plausible philosophical account of justice for future generations be developed? What counts as the ethical treatment of non-human animals? What does the term "natural" mean, and can natural environments as such have moral standing? (A) (B)

2016-2017 Winter
Category
Ethics
Social/Political Philosophy

PHIL 29411 Consequentialism from Bentham to Singer

(MAPH 39411, PLSC 29411)

Are some acts wrong "whatever the consequences"? Do consequences matter when acting for the sake of duty, or virtue, or what is right? How do "consequentialist" ethical theories, such as utilitarianism, address such issues? This course will address these questions by critically examining some of the most provocative defenses of consequentialism in the history of philosophy, from the work of the classical utilitarians Bentham, Mill, and Sidgwick to that of Peter Singer, one of the world's most influential living philosophers and the founder of the animal liberation and effective altruism movements. Does consequentialism lend itself to the Panoptical nightmares of the surveillance state, or can it be a force for a genuinely emancipatory ethics and politics? (A) (B)

2016-2017 Winter
Category
Ethics
Social/Political Philosophy

PHIL 22515 Philosophy: Practice, Form and Genre

(MAPH 32250)

This course provides an introduction to philosophy though a consideration of the extraordinary diversity of its historical pedagogical practices and literary (and non-literary) forms and genres. "Philosophy" has been everything from a way of life to an academic profession, and "philosophizing" has been conducted in such forms and genres as Socratic conversation, scholastic debate, lectures, group discussions, dialogues, aphorisms, fables, poetry, meditations, novels, reviews, essays, treatises, music, and more. Cultivating some sense of this diversity is crucial to understanding many of the deep differences between philosophical perspectives, past and present. (A) (B)

2016-2017 Autumn
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For full list of Bart Schultz's courses back to the 2012-13 academic year, see our searchable course database.