Lawrence Dallman

Lawrence Dallman
Research Interests: Philosophy of Science, Core Analytic Philosophy, Explanation, Appearance/Reality Distinction, Materialism and the History of Materialism, 19th-Century German Philosophy, Marx, Darwin, Sellars

Previous Education

MA, Philosophy, University of Chicago

BA, Philosophy, Montana State University

BA, English, Montana State University

Interests

Philosophy of Mind, Epistemology, Philosophy of Science, Nineteenth-Century Philosophy (especially Marx), Early Analytic Philosophy (especially Sellars), Twentieth-Century Continental Philosophy

Dissertation

Dissertation Title: "Marx's Scientific Naturalism"

Dissertation Committee: Brian Leiter (co-chair), Robert Richards (co-chair), Matthias Haase, and Michael Forster (Bonn)

Recent Courses

PHIL 29200-02 Junior Tutorial

Topic: Marx and Philosophy.  Karl Marx is at once an incisive philosophical thinker, and a powerful critic of the whole enterprise of philosophy. In this course, we will investigate Marx's critique of philosophy. In particular, we will do so with an eye to the implications such a critique may have for philosophy as it exists today. That is, we will ask what conclusions can be drawn within philosophy, and about philosophy, from Marxian premises. This will require careful examination of key works by Marx, as well as by Hegel, Feuerbach, and Engels. It will also involve reflection on central disputes in contemporary theoretical philosophy, including the mind-body problem, the problem of knowledge, and the naturalism/anti-naturalism dispute.

Meets with Jr/Sr section. Prerequisite: Open only to intensive-track majors. No more than two tutorials may be used to meet program requirements.

2018-2019 Winter

PHIL 29300-02 Senior Tutorial

Topic: Marx and Philosophy. Karl Marx is at once an incisive philosophical thinker, and a powerful critic of the whole enterprise of philosophy. In this course, we will investigate Marx's critique of philosophy. In particular, we will do so with an eye to the implications such a critique may have for philosophy as it exists today. That is, we will ask what conclusions can be drawn within philosophy, and about philosophy, from Marxian premises. This will require careful examination of key works by Marx, as well as by Hegel, Feuerbach, and Engels. It will also involve reflection on central disputes in contemporary theoretical philosophy, including the mind-body problem, the problem of knowledge, and the naturalism/anti-naturalism dispute.

Meets with Jr/Sr section. Prerequisite: Open only to intensive-track majors. No more than two tutorials may be used to meet program requirements.

2018-2019 Winter