Anton Ford

Anton Ford
Associate Professor
Stuart Hall, Room 210
Office Hours: On leave Autumn 2018
773.702.0827
University of Pittsburgh PhD (2008); Harvard University BA (1999)
Teaching at UChicago since 2007; On leave in Autumn 2018
Research Interests: Action Theory, Ethics, Political Philosophy, Ancient Philosophy

Anton Ford joined the faculty in 2007 and is an Associate Professor in Philosophy. His primary research and teaching interests are in Practical Philosophy, understood broadly to include Action Theory, Ethics, and Political Philosophy. Figures of special interest include Anscombe, Aristotle and Marx.

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Selected Publications

The Province of Human Agency Noûs 52:3 (2018): 697–720.

“The Progress of the Deed,” in Process, Action and Experience, ed. Rowland Stout (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018). 

“Third Parties to Compromise,” in NOMOS: Compromise, ed. Jack Knight (New York: New York University Press, 2018). 

The Representation of Action,” Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplements 80 (2017): 217-233.

On What is Front of Your Nose,” Philosophical Topics 44:1 (2016): 141-161.

The Arithmetic of Intention,” The American Philosophical Quarterly 52:2 (2015): 129–143.

Action and Passion,” Philosophical Topics 42:1 (2014): 13–42.  

Is Agency a Power of Self-Movement? Inquiry 56:6 (2013): 597–610.

Praktische Wahrnehmung,” Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 61:3 (2013): 403–418.

“Action and Generality,” in Essays on Anscombe’s Intention, ed. Anton Ford, Jennifer Hornsby and Frederick Stoutland (Harvard University Press, 2011).

Essays on Anscombe’s Intention, edited with Jennifer Hornsby and Frederick Stoutland (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2011) ed. Anton Ford, Jennifer Hornsby and Frederick Stoutland (Harvard University Press, 2011).

“The Just and the Fine: A Reply to Irwin,” Classical Philology, Vol. 105, No. 4, 2010, 396–402.

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Recent Courses

PHIL 20215/30215 The End of Life

(SCTH 30215)

Aristotle taught that happiness, or eudaimonia, is the end of human life, in the sense that it is what we should strive for. But, in another sense, death is the end of life. This course will explore how these two “ends” – happiness and death – are related to each other. But it will do so in the context of a wider set of concerns. For, it is not only our individual lives that come to an end: ways of life, cultural traditions, civilizations and epochs of human history end. We now live with the fear that human life on earth might end. How are we to think about, and live well in relation to, ends such as these? Readings from Aristotle, Marx, Engels, Freud, Heidegger, and Arendt.

 

Graduates: By permission of instructor.

2018-2019 Spring

PHIL 53021 Knowledge of Agency

The title of this course is ambiguous. It might be thought to refer, either, to the knowledge of which the agent is the object, or, alternatively, to the knowledge of which the agent is the subject. This course will consider how these two forms of knowledge are related to each other. Its guiding conjecture will be that the knowledge of which the agent is the subject is prior in the order of understanding to that of which the agent is the object. After considering Ryle's account of "knowledge-how" and Anscombe's investigation of the reason-requesting question "Why?", we will widen our focus to consider the general tendency of analytic philosophers to theorize human agency in terms of the way that agency is explained, rather than from the standpoint of the agent in the midst of action. This research seminar will presuppose some familiarity with the philosophy of action. (III) 

2018-2019 Winter
Category
Philosophy of Action
Epistemology

PHIL 29902 Senior Seminar II

Students writing senior essays register once for PHIL 29901, in either the Autumn or Winter Quarter, and once for PHIL 29902, in either the Winter or Spring Quarter. (Students may not register for both PHIL 29901 and 29902 in the same quarter.) The senior seminar meets all three quarters, and students writing essays are required to attend throughout.

Consent of director of undergraduate studies. Required and only open to fourth-year students who have been accepted into the BA essay program.

2016-2017 Spring

PHIL 29901 Senior Seminar I

Students writing senior essays register once for PHIL 29901, in either the Autumn or Winter Quarter, and once for PHIL 29902, in either the Winter or Spring Quarter. (Students may not register for both PHIL 29901 and 29902 in the same quarter.) The senior seminar meets all three quarters, and students writing essays are required to attend throughout.

Consent of director of undergraduate studies. Required and only open to fourth-year students who have been accepted into the BA essay program.

2016-2017 Winter

PHIL 29902 Senior Seminar II

Students writing senior essays register once for PHIL 29901, in either the Autumn or Winter Quarter, and once for PHIL 29902, in either the Winter or Spring Quarter. (Students may not register for both PHIL 29901 and 29902 in the same quarter.) The senior seminar meets all three quarters, and students writing essays are required to attend throughout.

Consent of director of undergraduate studies. Required and only open to fourth-year students who have been accepted into the BA essay program.

2016-2017 Winter

PHIL 21502/31502 Racial Injustice

(A) (I)

2016-2017 Winter
Category
Philosophy of Race

PHIL 29901 Senior Seminar I

Students writing senior essays register once for PHIL 29901, in either the Autumn or Winter Quarter, and once for PHIL 29902, in either the Winter or Spring Quarter. (Students may not register for both PHIL 29901 and 29902 in the same quarter.) The senior seminar meets all three quarters, and students writing essays are required to attend throughout.

Consent of director of undergraduate studies. Required and only open to fourth-year students who have been accepted into the BA essay program.

2016-2017 Autumn

PHIL 22220/32220 Marx's Capital, Volume I

(FNDL 22220)

(A) (I) (V)

2016-2017 Autumn
Category
Social/Political Philosophy
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For full list of Anton Ford's courses back to the 2012-13 academic year, see our searchable course database.