Emily Dupree

Emily Dupree
Research Interests: Moral and Political Philosophy, Ethics, Social Epistemology, Metaphysics of Gender

Previous Education

MA in Philosophy, University of Chicago

BA in Philosophy, UCLA

Interests

Moral and Political Philosophy, Ethics, Social Epistemology, Metaphysics of Gender

Recent Courses

PHIL 29200-01 Junior Tutorial

Topic: Race, Gender, and the Production of Knowledge. This course explores the field of “social epistemology” with a special emphasis on gender and race. We will examine classical models of knowledge in contrast to contemporary models of epistemic interdependence, focusing on how the production of knowledge is impacted by group social structures and what social practices must be in place to ensure that voices of the marginalized are heard and believed. Looking at examples from literature and film, we will investigate how race and gender intersect with these issues, especially on the topics of testimony, White ignorance, and epistemic injustice. Finally we will explore the possibility of an ethical epistemic future, asking how we can redress wrongdoing and construct communities of epistemic resistance and epistemic justice.

Meets with Jr/Sr section. Open only to intensive-track majors. No more than two tutorials may be used to meet program requirements.

2018-2019 Spring
Category
Epistemology
Social/Political Philosophy

PHIL 29300-01 Senior Tutorial

Topic: Race, Gender, and the Production of Knowledge. This course explores the field of “social epistemology” with a special emphasis on gender and race. We will examine classical models of knowledge in contrast to contemporary models of epistemic interdependence, focusing on how the production of knowledge is impacted by group social structures and what social practices must be in place to ensure that voices of the marginalized are heard and believed. Looking at examples from literature and film, we will investigate how race and gender intersect with these issues, especially on the topics of testimony, White ignorance, and epistemic injustice. Finally we will explore the possibility of an ethical epistemic future, asking how we can redress wrongdoing and construct communities of epistemic resistance and epistemic justice.

Meets with Jr/Sr section. Open only to intensive-track majors. No more than two tutorials may be used to meet program requirements.

2018-2019 Spring
Category
Epistemology
Social/Political Philosophy