Society of Fellows Affiliated Faculty

Harper & Schmidt Fellows in the Humanities are Assistant Professors in the College with four-year postdoctoral teaching appointments whose primary teaching is in the Humanities Common Core, sequences of general education courses required of all undergraduates in the College.  In addition, they teach at least one undergraduate course in the Department of Philosophy during the course of their appointment and they regularly participate in workshops and graduate seminars, providing significant additional intellectual resources for our philosophical community.

For more information about the Harper & Schmidt Fellowship Program and how to apply to it, see: https://fellows.uchicago.edu and http://societyoffellows.uchicago.edu/.

The Department of Philosophy currently has three Harper-Schmidt Fellows:

Marcello Barison

Mark Berger

Alex Silverman

 

 

Marcello Barison

Marcello Barison received his BA and MA at the University of Padua (Italy). His thesis (MA dissertation), which then turned into his first book (La Costituzione metafisica del Mondo), concerns the concept of world in the contemporary German thought. From that work, also owing to an annual stay at the Humboldt Universitšt zu Berlin, he explored the twentieth century German philosophy more and more thoroughly, especially devoting his attention to the figure of Martin Heidegger. He completed his doctoral studies at the Istituto Italiano di Scienze Umane (SUM) in Naples in collaboration with the Albert-Ludwigs-Universitšt Freiburg. In addition to lectures and publications focusing on 20th century continental philosophy, he has written on contemporary art, literature and architecture. In the academic years 2011-2013 he covered the role of adjunct professor of Aesthetics at the University of Ferrara (Faculty of Architecture). Since January 2013 he had been a visiting scholar at the Philosophy Department of Columbia University-Barnard College (New York), where he filled the position of visiting adjunct professor during fall semester 2013. He was then 2015 Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies, Southeastern Europe (CAS SEE, University of Rijeka, Croatia).

Marcello is currently working on two research projects. The first aims at developing an actual philosophy of architecture that, on a conceptual basis, discusses the fundamentals of the architectural practice, its aesthetic implications, and the character of the peculiar Weltanschauung implied by each single architectural model. The second one is devoted to transcendental cosmology; there he proposes an emergentist, cosmological concept of the transcendental by interpreting it as a self-organising morphogenetic structure, independent from the articulation of subjectivity and its a priori categories.

In the last decade Marcello has constantly been performing a professional pictorial activity too. Some of his works are in private collections in the United States and Europe. (www.marcellobarison.com)

CV (PDF)

Contact

office: Gates-Blake 318
email: mbarison@uchicago.edu


Mark Berger

Mark Berger received his PhD from Columbia University in 2015. His research interests focus on the intersection of ethics and political philosophy, most especially concerning questions of value pluralism. His other work deals with issues in practical reason, democratic theory, non-ideal theory, toleration, and distributive justice. He teaches Human Being and Citizen in the College.

Contact

office: Gates-Blake 405
email: bergerm@uchicago.edu




Alex Silverman

silverman

Alex Silverman received his Ph.D. in Philosophy from Yale University in 2014.  He works primarily on early modern philosophy.  His dissertation, entitled “The Union of Thought and Being in Spinoza,” explores Benedict de Spinoza's attempted navigation between materialist and idealist conceptions of nature.  The dissertation charts this navigation primarily with respect to Spinoza's theories of the divine attributes and the mind-body relation.  In addition to his interest in Spinoza, Alex has also worked on foundational questions in John Locke’s metaphysics and epistemology, especially concerning Locke’s response to radical skepticism.  Regarding future projects, he hopes to investigate the practical implications of and interconnections between Spinoza’s and Locke’s systems.  In particular, he is fascinated by Spinoza’s and Locke’s pioneering conceptions of religious toleration, and the ways in which their views on toleration are both similar to and different from contemporary perspectives.

CV (PDF)

Contact

office: Gates-Blake 403
office phone: 773-702-7979
office hours: Winter Quarter, Wednesdays: 2:00 - 4:00 pm
email: adsilverman@uchicago.edu

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